Destruction Baby

In 2016, Nana Komatsu starred in Destruction Babies, a somber, nihilistic and utterly violent tale which was met with either love or hate reviews ! She impersonated Nana -a hostess working in a Yakuza owned club- who at some point in the story finds herself in the wrong place at the wrong time. Nana Komatsu was just 20 and skilfully handled dark scenes, a performance rewarded with several nominations and awards.

OnderHond: “As for the actors, they do a pretty spectacular job. Yuya Yagira (Dare mo Shiranai) takes on the role of Taira and almost effortlessly embodies one of the most enigmatic and charismatic characters I’ve come across in recent memory. Taira is almost impossible to read, but his sly grin, misplaced sense of amusement and disturbingly haphazard attitude make for a truly interesting character. Masaki Suda and Nana Komatsu are equally charismatic, though their motivations are at least somewhat more understandable. It’s a stellar cast

Useful Links: Film Site (with trailer) – InstagramTwitter


promo pics


Short clip from the making of



Shoplifter


Hostess

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Bis Mag 2018

Since early May 2018, Nana Komatsu had been busy promoting Koi Ame, a live action movie in which she starred with Yo Oizumi. On June 1, Bis Magazine online released a preview of its forthcoming July edition: the actress and model on the cover, a 10-page article and over 30 pics on glossy paper ! This magazine is still available from various online stores like Amazon Japan.



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There is no tomorrow

You know what is the rarest thing on earth? It’s not gold, it is not stardust, it is not platinum nor antimatter. The rarest thing of all is benevolence.’ This is one of the lines you hear from an unnamed character in ‘There is no tomorrow’ (明日なんてない – Ashita nante nai), a short film by French photographer, director and writer Julien Levy.

The self-produced movie (released in 2016 – runtime: 10’24”) showcased actress Nana Komatsu in a long monologue, filmed and directed by Lévy. Their collaboration was based on a common wish to make something ‘radical’.

The previous year, Julien Lévy organised a photo session with the actress for his forthcoming photobook, Every Day Is Doomsday, which is still available from various online stores, including Amazon.



Trailer-Film

Japanese Audio – English Subs



Photosession-Photobook

Every Day Is Doomsday


Selected Screencaps

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Big Comic Spirits

In May and June 2018, actress Nana Komatsu was busy promoting Koi Ame aka After The Rain, a live action movie directed by Akira Nagai, in which she starred with Yo Oizumi: magazines, interviews, premiere events or TV shows on a daily basis. She made the cover of Big Comic Spirits Weekly on June 4, #25. Photos by Chizuru Abe.





Bonus: screencaps from the clip

Métiers d’Art 2017

Chanel‘s 2016-2017 ‘Métiers d’Art Collection – Paris Cosmopolite Show’ was to be held in Tokyo on May 31, 2017. Prior to the event, Chanel Official released two clips featuring House Ambassador Nana Komatsu filmed at the Ritz Hotel in Paris and visiting Chanel’s workshops.






Sources: Madame Figaro JapanThe Fashion SpotChanel France Facebook

Drowning Love Recollection


Plot from AsianWiki: “Natsume Mochizuki (Nana Komatsu) works as a teen model in Tokyo, but she learns that she has to move to her father’s hometown of Ukigumo. She is in a desperate situation because she can’t do the things she wants to do in Ukigumo. One day, she meets Koichiro Hasegawa (Masaki Suda). He is the successor of the Hasegawa family. His family is wealthy and is respected in the area. Natsume Mochizuki and Koichiro Hasegawa become attracted to each other, but something changes their fate”.


Review Excerpt: “Drowning love is, besides being a rather unconventional love narrative, a demonstration of Yamato Yuki’s cinematographical talent. By framing the ever beautiful Nana Komatsu in concatenations of inventive compositions, Yuki Yamato succeeds in showing how cinematography as such can be used to communicate subjectivity in a romantic narrative. By evoking her subjectivity in a way that allows the spectator to feel like she feels, Yamato has created, despite the obvious romanticism, a sincere and believable account of Natsume’s first love”. Read the full review from Psycho Cinematography.


A few posters from Japan and South Korea


Official Stills


From the making of

Bus Scene

Festival

Otomo

Screen caps collection


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